Notable Impact of Urban Reserves and Saskatoon

Posted by Bob Joseph

Apr 25, 2016 12:43:42 PM

The first urban reserve in Canada was created in 1988 in the City of Saskatoon. The relationship between Saskatoon and Muskeg Lake Cree Nation (MLCN) was unique at the time but thankfully is no longer as urban reserves are becoming more common. Saskatoon now has five urban reserves and four Treaty Land Entitlement (TLE) selections. TLEs are lands that have been selected and acquired with funds under the Treaty Land Entitlement (1992) Framework.

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Topics: Indigenous relations, Indigenous economic development

6 Things You May Want to Know About the Daniels Decision

Posted by Bob Joseph

Apr 18, 2016 7:15:21 AM

There are a lot of questions and some confusion out there about the April 14, 2016 Supreme Court of Canada ruling on Daniels v. Canada (Indian Affairs and Northern Development) (Daniels) and I’ve received quite a number of “what does this mean?” emails so figured a blog post on the topic would be timely. What follows are some notable legal perspectives from Indigenous law legal experts along with my not legal comments.

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Topics: Metis

Fabulous Five Indigenous Women Nominees for Canadian Banknotes

Posted by Bob Joseph

Apr 12, 2016 4:00:31 PM

For the first time since the Bank of Canada began issuing banknotes in 1935 the bills will feature a woman other than the Queen or members of the Royal Family. It’s astounding that an iconic Canadian woman has never been represented on Canadian banknotes until now but, hey, “it’s 2016”.

In order to determine who should be featured, the bank has asked the public to submit their nominations. Here’s the criteria:

  • They are a Canadian (by birth or naturalization) who has demonstrated outstanding leadership, achievement or distinction in any field, benefiting the people of Canada, or in the service of Canada.
  • They have been deceased for at least 25 years.

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Topics: Indigenous Peoples

What is the Relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Animals

Posted by Bob Joseph

Apr 4, 2016 7:09:16 AM

From time to time people ask me about the relationship between Indigenous peoples and animals. For some, the knowledge of the natural world - the land, plants, animals, seasons and cycles of nature - has been a central tenet of their lives and worldviews since the dawn of time. Their understanding of the natural world is sophisticated and comprehensive. The natural world, now commonly referred to as the “environment”, is not viewed as a separate entity but one, interconnected aspect of the whole. This interconnectedness equates to a moral responsibility to care for, live in harmony with, and respect the natural world.

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Topics: Spiritual Beliefs, Indigenous Peoples

Free Prior and Informed Consent and the Nation to Nation Relationship

Posted by Admin

Apr 1, 2016 8:55:28 AM

This article was contributed by Matthew Hutchinson. 

Last year, the first World Conference on Indigenous Peoples adopted a consensus statement reaffirming support for the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Right of Indigenous Peoples. Perry Bellegarde, then Chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations and currently the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, spoke at the event, stating afterwards that “it was an opportunity for all states to reaffirm their commitment to working constructively with Indigenous peoples.”[1] Canada, however, was the only United Nations Member State to raise objections over the landmark document, maintaining that it could not commit to upholding provisions in the 2007 Declaration that affirm the right of local communities, particularly Indigenous peoples, to ‘free, prior and informed consent’ (FPIC).

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Indigenous cultural competency self-assessment checklist

Posted by Bob Joseph

Mar 29, 2016 7:30:15 AM

There’s a growing interest in Indigenous cultural competency in Canada and it’s very heartening to witness this change in attitude in government, the corporate sector and in the general public. I am certainly seeing it reflected in the wide diversity of clients seeking cultural competency training for their organizations. My client base was formerly composed of a few core sectors but no more. I am really enjoying the opportunity to meet people from many walks of life but who share a common interest of wanting to learn more about Indigenous Peoples in Canada. 

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Topics: Indigenous Awareness

The Indian Act and Taxes

Posted by Bob Joseph

Mar 23, 2016 6:59:53 AM

Every year when the calendar rolls over to tax time the old refrain “Indians* don’t pay taxes” is trotted out by Canadians who truly believe the Indigenous population benefits unfairly from federal law. This is the most frequently quoted myth regarding Indigenous people. Because of its popularity, we decided to provide a historical context about tax exemptions. *We do not generally use the term “Indian” as some may find it incorrect and insulting but for the purposes of this article we use it as that is the terminology used in the Indian Act, which we reference here. Also, please keep in mind we are not tax experts; contact a Canada Revenue Agency office with any questions you may have.

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Lessons in Indigenous Negotiations Part 4

Posted by Bob Joseph

Mar 21, 2016 7:27:25 AM

Lesson 4: Negotiation is a Skill, or “I Can Do This, Can’t I?”

In over 30 years of experience with Indigenous negotiations, I have been at the table with hundreds of negotiators. Many of them should never have been in the room. I know this sounds harsh, but being effective in Indigenous negotiations is very hard to do and is not for everyone.

 

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Topics: Contributors, Indigenous relations

Urban Reserves and Economic Independence

Posted by Bob Joseph

Mar 15, 2016 11:11:21 AM

Paul K. Ledoux, Council Member, Muskeg Lake Cree Nation was a guest speaker at the Urban Reserves Forum in Winnipeg in early March 2016. Paul contacted us for permission to use some of the tips in our ebook 27 Working Effectively with Aboriginal Peoples® Must Do’s as part of his presentation. Paul is so informed about developing and managing an urban reserve we wanted to learn more so here's our Q & A with him. Paul's' bio and a link to download a pdf of his presentation are at the end of the article. 

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Topics: Aboriginal Economic Development, Indigenous relations

Lessons in Indigenous Negotiations Part 3

Posted by Admin

Mar 14, 2016 11:32:35 AM

Lesson 3 of 4: Getting to Maybe, or “Why is ‘Yes’ So Hard?”

Perhaps the most common refrain heard from the non-Indigenous party to a negotiation goes something like this: “Our negotiators have agreed to all of the main issues but the Chief seems to be stalling us. He/She is not prepared to sign the agreement, even though everything is agreed. Makes no sense to us, so let’s give them a hard deadline to sign or we will walk.” 

 

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Topics: Indigenous relations