26 Ways to Derail Your Indigenous Community Meeting

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jul 27, 2016 6:23:34 AM

Hosting frequent community meetings to share information and milestones is an important part of your relationship building and maintenance with the Indigenous community you are working with or hope to work with. If community meetings are done right, you build trust which will be important for both parties when you and the community are ready to move from consultation to negotiation.

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Topics: Indigenous relations

Indigenous Peoples terminology guidelines for usage

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jul 20, 2016 10:35:22 AM

We’ve talked about the definition of Indigenous Peoples and the constitutional significance of Indigenous or Aboriginal. In this article we drill down on guidelines for usage. Terms for Indigenous Peoples have evolved over time and are continuing to evolve.


The First Peoples of this land now known as Canada formerly had unique communities with unique names - there wasn’t a need for collective nouns or complicated terminology. With European contact and ensuing colonization, the government required people to be defined and labeled for ease of governing.

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Topics: Indigenous Awareness

What is the definition of Indigenous Peoples

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jul 13, 2016 6:12:52 AM

We’ve talked about the constitutional implications of Indigenous or Aboriginal so now want to tackle the definition of Indigenous Peoples in Canada and who uses this term and why.


First, as it stands, there is no generally accepted definition of Indigenous Peoples in a global context. Some countries refer to Indigenous Peoples as the people who were there first at contact. Others refer to Indigenous Peoples as the nomadic peoples within their borders.   

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Topics: Indigenous Awareness, Indigenous relations

UNDRIP Consent: A Moving Target

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jul 6, 2016 7:06:45 AM

 

1. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is the framework for reconciliation at all levels and across all sectors of Canadian society. [1]

In May 2016 when Canada removed its official objector status and officially endorsed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) it sparked numerous reactions ranging from joy and empowerment to fear, gloom, doubt and confusion. In this article we are going to focus on the confusion aspect.

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Topics: Indigenous relations

10 quotes John A. Macdonald made about First Nations

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jun 28, 2016 11:19:02 AM

July 1 is Canada Day, a day during which many Canadians celebrate the achievements of the founding fathers of this country. Sir John Alexander Macdonald, as the first Prime Minister of Canada, July 1, 1867 - November 5, 1873, (and again October 17, 1878 - June 6 1891) will be one of those whose achievements will be celebrated.


In the spirit of reconciliation, we wanted to provide a perspective of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald that is often overlooked when the accolades are flowing. He was the architect of the Indian Act which launched the government of Canada on an ever increasingly and repressive series of Acts and policies directed towards the assimilation of the original inhabitants of this land now known as Canada. Residential schools, a cornerstone of the assimilation policy, was recently branded “cultural genocide” by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

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Topics: Indian Act

Indigenous Economic Development Corporations – The ABCs

Posted by Admin

Jun 27, 2016 1:15:50 PM

Sometimes when the name says it all, the name says it all. This is true in a basic sense with Indigenous Economic Development Corporations. Namely a corporation (or group of corporations) formed to develop the economic activity of a community.

 

Economic Development Corporations (also known as “EDCs”) in short form are corporations formed under the laws of governmental regulation to manage the economic arm of the Indigenous community. They are becoming more and more commonly used in Canada and, more importantly, are becoming more influential in the overall Canadian corporate environment.

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Topics: Indigenous economic development

Protecting Indigenous Traditional Knowledge plus an Agreement example

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jun 22, 2016 6:25:41 AM

Indigenous Traditional Knowledge (TK) is now a common component of environmental impact assessments and resource management policies. This was not always the case and now that TK is a requirement it poses a significant problem for Indigenous communities – the very real need to protect and preserve the information.  Communities are increasingly inundated with requests for TK studies which put preservation of their TK at risk. Access to Indigenous Traditional Knowledge is a gift, not a right.

Gary Pritchard, an Environmental and Ecological Coordinator with Neegan Burnside Ltd., writes TK agreements for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous clients. He shares some of his insight here and has also provided a generic TK consent and confidentiality agreement that can be downloaded and adapted.

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Topics: Indigenous relations

National Aboriginal Day or National Indigenous Day

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jun 13, 2016 11:40:50 AM

 

The implications of choosing Indigenous are significant. In October 2015, Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau used the term Indigenous in his victory speech when he made reference to his government’s intention for a "renewed nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous Peoples that respects rights and honours treaties".

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Topics: Aboriginal History, Indigenous Awareness

Indigenous cultural competency in virtual platform

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jun 9, 2016 6:26:01 PM

 

Thanks to the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions calls to action; and specifically section #92 which states: 

       92. Business and Reconciliation

We call upon the corporate sector in Canada to….

iii. Provide education for management and staff on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

I’ve noticed a big influx of people looking for training to support their efforts at reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples. This push of course comes with challenges and the ones we’ve heard about include "not having money for travel to take training" and "which trainer to choose" as everyone is a trainer these days.

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Topics: Reconciliation, Indigenous Awareness

Duncan McCue: Mainstream Media and Reconciliation

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 30, 2016 6:23:35 AM

 

The Commission believes that in the coming years, media outlets and journalists will greatly influence whether or not reconciliation ultimately transforms the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples. To ensure that the colonial press truly becomes a thing of the past in twenty-first-century Canada, the media must engage in its own acts of reconciliation with Aboriginal peoples. [1]

 

Duncan McCue has been a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. His news and current affairs pieces are featured on CBC's flagship news show, The National. We went to Duncan for his perspective on the role of mainstream media and reconciliation.

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Topics: Indigenous relations