10 quotes John A. Macdonald made about First Nations

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jun 28, 2016 11:19:02 AM

July 1 is Canada Day, a day during which many Canadians celebrate the achievements of the founding fathers of this country. Sir John Alexander Macdonald, as the first Prime Minister of Canada, July 1, 1867 - November 5, 1873, (and again October 17, 1878 - June 6 1891) will be one of those whose achievements will be celebrated.


In the spirit of reconciliation, we wanted to provide a perspective of Prime Minister John A. Macdonald that is often overlooked when the accolades are flowing. He was the architect of the Indian Act which launched the government of Canada on an ever increasingly and repressive series of Acts and policies directed towards the assimilation of the original inhabitants of this land now known as Canada. Residential schools, a cornerstone of the assimilation policy, was recently branded “cultural genocide” by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

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Topics: Indian Act

Indigenous Economic Development Corporations – The ABCs

Posted by Admin

Jun 27, 2016 1:15:50 PM

Sometimes when the name says it all, the name says it all. This is true in a basic sense with Indigenous Economic Development Corporations. Namely a corporation (or group of corporations) formed to develop the economic activity of a community.

 

Economic Development Corporations (also known as “EDCs”) in short form are corporations formed under the laws of governmental regulation to manage the economic arm of the Indigenous community. They are becoming more and more commonly used in Canada and, more importantly, are becoming more influential in the overall Canadian corporate environment.

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Topics: Indigenous economic development

Protecting Indigenous Traditional Knowledge plus an Agreement example

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jun 22, 2016 6:25:41 AM

Indigenous Traditional Knowledge (TK) is now a common component of environmental impact assessments and resource management policies. This was not always the case and now that TK is a requirement it poses a significant problem for Indigenous communities – the very real need to protect and preserve the information.  Communities are increasingly inundated with requests for TK studies which put preservation of their TK at risk. Access to Indigenous Traditional Knowledge is a gift, not a right.

Gary Pritchard, an Environmental and Ecological Coordinator with Neegan Burnside Ltd., writes TK agreements for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous clients. He shares some of his insight here and has also provided a generic TK consent and confidentiality agreement that can be downloaded and adapted.

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Topics: Indigenous relations

National Aboriginal Day or National Indigenous Day

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jun 13, 2016 11:40:50 AM

 

The implications of choosing Indigenous are significant. In October 2015, Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau used the term Indigenous in his victory speech when he made reference to his government’s intention for a "renewed nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous Peoples that respects rights and honours treaties".

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Topics: Aboriginal History, Indigenous Awareness

Indigenous cultural competency in virtual platform

Posted by Bob Joseph

Jun 9, 2016 6:26:01 PM

 

Thanks to the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions calls to action; and specifically section #92 which states: 

       92. Business and Reconciliation

We call upon the corporate sector in Canada to….

iii. Provide education for management and staff on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

I’ve noticed a big influx of people looking for training to support their efforts at reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples. This push of course comes with challenges and the ones we’ve heard about include "not having money for travel to take training" and "which trainer to choose" as everyone is a trainer these days.

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Topics: Reconciliation, Indigenous Awareness

Duncan McCue: Mainstream Media and Reconciliation

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 30, 2016 6:23:35 AM

 

The Commission believes that in the coming years, media outlets and journalists will greatly influence whether or not reconciliation ultimately transforms the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples. To ensure that the colonial press truly becomes a thing of the past in twenty-first-century Canada, the media must engage in its own acts of reconciliation with Aboriginal peoples. [1]

 

Duncan McCue has been a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. His news and current affairs pieces are featured on CBC's flagship news show, The National. We went to Duncan for his perspective on the role of mainstream media and reconciliation.

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Topics: Indigenous relations

Maps of traditional Indigenous territories

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 26, 2016 5:43:39 AM

“I’ve noticed a trend that people maintain their own tribal name based on being in their traditional homeland. I think a lot of it is because the names they used for themselves usually are descriptive phrases. So, a lot of tribes call themselves, ‘we are the people at the mouth of the river’. If you have been removed from your territory through the trail of tears, or the long walk by like a thousand miles from where that mouth of the river is people no longer think of themselves as ‘the people at the mouth of the river’. When you get dispossessed of your traditional homeland, there is a cultural rift that happens. A loss that happens from being off of where you are supposed to be.” Aaron Carapella, Two Row Times, 2013


There are maps of reserves (reservations in the United States), maps of language groups, maps of treaty-making, regional maps of traditional territories but up until recently there weren’t any that showed the original Indigenous traditional territories with original Indigenous names.

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Topics: Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal History

The Indian Act, residential schools and tuberculosis cover up

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 17, 2016 8:00:00 AM

 

Schools.

Indian Act. R. S., c. 43, s. 1. 1884

11. The Governor in Council may make regulations, which shall have the force of law, for the committal by justices or Indian agents of children of Indian blood under the age of sixteen years, to such industrial school or boarding school, there to be kept, cared for and educated for a period not extending beyond the time at which such children shall reach the age of eighteen years.”

And so it began….the most aggressive and destructive of all Indian Act policies. Residential schools brought immeasurable human suffering to the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples, the effect of which continues to reverberate through generations of families and many communities. Other policies were harsh but could be worked around. They banned the potlatch so practitioners went underground to hold ceremonies; they pushed people onto small reserves but they still were with family. But when they took the children that was unbearable.

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Topics: Indian Residential Schools

Indigenous relations and environmental studies Neegan Burnside example

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 9, 2016 12:30:25 PM

Gary Pritchard is an Environmental Project Manager with Neegan Burnside Ltd (Neegan). Neegan is an Aboriginal majority owned firm committed to assisting Indigenous communities, agencies and industry meet their development and economic goals while remaining sensitive to culture, values and beliefs. We got to know Gary when he and some colleagues attended our Indigenous Consultation and Engagement™ training in Toronto. It was great to have Gary, who is a member of the Curve Lake First Nation, in the room to share his insight from the perspective of environmental studies and Indigenous communities. We wanted to learn more so he kindly took some questions from us.

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Topics: Indigenous relations

7 Common Elements in successful Indigenous Relations Strategies

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 3, 2016 6:20:04 PM

Indigenous relations is an evolving field, especially now in light of the federal government’s commitment to negotiation on a nation-to-nation basis. Over the years we’ve looked at strategies and talked to people about what makes a successful strategy. 

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Topics: Indigenous relations