Duncan McCue: Mainstream Media and Reconciliation

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 30, 2016 6:23:35 AM

 

The Commission believes that in the coming years, media outlets and journalists will greatly influence whether or not reconciliation ultimately transforms the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples. To ensure that the colonial press truly becomes a thing of the past in twenty-first-century Canada, the media must engage in its own acts of reconciliation with Aboriginal peoples. [1]

 

Duncan McCue has been a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. His news and current affairs pieces are featured on CBC's flagship news show, The National. We went to Duncan for his perspective on the role of mainstream media and reconciliation.

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Topics: Indigenous relations

Maps of traditional Indigenous territories

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 26, 2016 5:43:39 AM

“I’ve noticed a trend that people maintain their own tribal name based on being in their traditional homeland. I think a lot of it is because the names they used for themselves usually are descriptive phrases. So, a lot of tribes call themselves, ‘we are the people at the mouth of the river’. If you have been removed from your territory through the trail of tears, or the long walk by like a thousand miles from where that mouth of the river is people no longer think of themselves as ‘the people at the mouth of the river’. When you get dispossessed of your traditional homeland, there is a cultural rift that happens. A loss that happens from being off of where you are supposed to be.” Aaron Carapella, Two Row Times, 2013


There are maps of reserves (reservations in the United States), maps of language groups, maps of treaty-making, regional maps of traditional territories but up until recently there weren’t any that showed the original Indigenous traditional territories with original Indigenous names.

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Topics: Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal History

The Indian Act, residential schools and tuberculosis cover up

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 17, 2016 8:00:00 AM

 

Schools.

Indian Act. R. S., c. 43, s. 1. 1884

11. The Governor in Council may make regulations, which shall have the force of law, for the committal by justices or Indian agents of children of Indian blood under the age of sixteen years, to such industrial school or boarding school, there to be kept, cared for and educated for a period not extending beyond the time at which such children shall reach the age of eighteen years.”

And so it began….the most aggressive and destructive of all Indian Act policies. Residential schools brought immeasurable human suffering to the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples, the effect of which continues to reverberate through generations of families and many communities. Other policies were harsh but could be worked around. They banned the potlatch so practitioners went underground to hold ceremonies; they pushed people onto small reserves but they still were with family. But when they took the children that was unbearable.

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Topics: Indian Residential Schools

Indigenous relations and environmental studies Neegan Burnside example

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 9, 2016 12:30:25 PM

Gary Pritchard is an Environmental Project Manager with Neegan Burnside Ltd (Neegan). Neegan is an Aboriginal majority owned firm committed to assisting Indigenous communities, agencies and industry meet their development and economic goals while remaining sensitive to culture, values and beliefs. We got to know Gary when he and some colleagues attended our Indigenous Consultation and Engagement™ training in Toronto. It was great to have Gary, who is a member of the Curve Lake First Nation, in the room to share his insight from the perspective of environmental studies and Indigenous communities. We wanted to learn more so he kindly took some questions from us.

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Topics: Indigenous relations

7 Common Elements in successful Indigenous Relations Strategies

Posted by Bob Joseph

May 3, 2016 6:20:04 PM

Indigenous relations is an evolving field, especially now in light of the federal government’s commitment to negotiation on a nation-to-nation basis. Over the years we’ve looked at strategies and talked to people about what makes a successful strategy. 

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Topics: Indigenous relations

Notable Impact of Urban Reserves and Saskatoon

Posted by Bob Joseph

Apr 25, 2016 12:43:42 PM

The first urban reserve in Canada was created in 1988 in the City of Saskatoon. The relationship between Saskatoon and Muskeg Lake Cree Nation (MLCN) was unique at the time but thankfully is no longer as urban reserves are becoming more common. Saskatoon now has five urban reserves and four Treaty Land Entitlement (TLE) selections. TLEs are lands that have been selected and acquired with funds under the Treaty Land Entitlement (1992) Framework.

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Topics: Indigenous relations, Indigenous economic development

6 Things You May Want to Know About the Daniels Decision

Posted by Bob Joseph

Apr 18, 2016 7:15:21 AM

There are a lot of questions and some confusion out there about the April 14, 2016 Supreme Court of Canada ruling on Daniels v. Canada (Indian Affairs and Northern Development) (Daniels) and I’ve received quite a number of “what does this mean?” emails so figured a blog post on the topic would be timely. What follows are some notable legal perspectives from Indigenous law legal experts along with my not legal comments.

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Topics: Metis

Fabulous Five Indigenous Women Nominees for Canadian Banknotes

Posted by Bob Joseph

Apr 12, 2016 4:00:31 PM

For the first time since the Bank of Canada began issuing banknotes in 1935 the bills will feature a woman other than the Queen or members of the Royal Family. It’s astounding that an iconic Canadian woman has never been represented on Canadian banknotes until now but, hey, “it’s 2016”.

In order to determine who should be featured, the bank has asked the public to submit their nominations. Here’s the criteria:

  • They are a Canadian (by birth or naturalization) who has demonstrated outstanding leadership, achievement or distinction in any field, benefiting the people of Canada, or in the service of Canada.
  • They have been deceased for at least 25 years.

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Topics: Indigenous Peoples

What is the Relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Animals

Posted by Bob Joseph

Apr 4, 2016 7:09:16 AM

From time to time people ask me about the relationship between Indigenous peoples and animals. For some, the knowledge of the natural world - the land, plants, animals, seasons and cycles of nature - has been a central tenet of their lives and worldviews since the dawn of time. Their understanding of the natural world is sophisticated and comprehensive. The natural world, now commonly referred to as the “environment”, is not viewed as a separate entity but one, interconnected aspect of the whole. This interconnectedness equates to a moral responsibility to care for, live in harmony with, and respect the natural world.

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Topics: Spiritual Beliefs, Indigenous Peoples

Free Prior and Informed Consent and the Nation to Nation Relationship

Posted by Admin

Apr 1, 2016 8:55:28 AM

This article was contributed by Matthew Hutchinson. 

Last year, the first World Conference on Indigenous Peoples adopted a consensus statement reaffirming support for the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Right of Indigenous Peoples. Perry Bellegarde, then Chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations and currently the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, spoke at the event, stating afterwards that “it was an opportunity for all states to reaffirm their commitment to working constructively with Indigenous peoples.”[1] Canada, however, was the only United Nations Member State to raise objections over the landmark document, maintaining that it could not commit to upholding provisions in the 2007 Declaration that affirm the right of local communities, particularly Indigenous peoples, to ‘free, prior and informed consent’ (FPIC).

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