Respecting First Nations Cultural Diversity

“Anishinaabe, Métis, Coastal Salish, Cree, Cherokee. We have nothing much in common. We’re all aboriginal and we have the drum. That’s about it.” Thomas King writing about a drum circle in “The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America”

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Rhonda Maskiewich - Taking a Holistic Approach to Aboriginal Relations

 In this Q and A, Rhonda shares some great advice on Working Effectively with Aboriginal Peoples® and the importance of building relationships and taking a holistic approach when looking for solutions.

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Sixties Scoop Apprehension of Aboriginal Children without Consent

The term “Sixties Scoop” refers to the period from 1961 through to the 1980s that saw an astounding number of Aboriginal babies and children literally scooped from the arms of their parents and placed in boarding schools or the homes of middle-class Euro-Canadian families. This period of child apprehension arose in the wake of the closing of the Indian residential schools.

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First Nation Protocol Usage of Ancestral and Spiritual Names

According to Merriam Webster, protocol is “a system of rules that explain the correct conduct and procedures to be followed in formal situations.” When communicating with a chief and council of a First Nation, it is important to put it in perspective - you are in a formal situation - you are communicating with the head of a Nation, or one of many heads of the Nation. First Nation protocols differ from Nation to Nation, so you need to learn the protocols in advance of a meeting and respect those protocols during all interactions.

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UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples


On September 13, 2007 the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) was adopted by 144 countries, with 11 abstentions and four countries voting against it. These four countries were Canada, the USA, New Zealand, and Australia. By the close of 2010, all four dissenting countries reversed their positions and endorsed the Declaration.

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Eyford Report and Aboriginal Awareness Training

Bob Joseph

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Who owns TEK?

Definition: “Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) describes aboriginal, indigenous, or other forms of traditional knowledges regarding sustainability of local resources. TEK refers to "a cumulative body of knowledge, belief, and practice, evolving by accumulation of TEK and handed down through generations through traditional songs, stories and beliefs. [It concerns] the relationship of living beings (including human) with their traditional groups and with their environment." Wikipedia

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"Indian giver" - Where did it come from, and can we give it back?

Bob Joseph

A post we wrote in early October 2013 about a celebrity who used a colloquialism on air received over 1600 opens on our website, according to our analytic report. This got us thinking about the degree of interest there is within our readership to find out more about colloquialisms so we thought we should provide some background to the origins of these expressions.

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Shelagh Rogers Her Journey from Her Head to her Heart as Hon. Witness

Shelagh Rogers, OC, journalist, host/producer of the CBC radio program The Next Chapter and Chancellor of University of Victoria, is as an Honorary Witness for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. She took some time from her very busy schedule to speak with us about her passion for reconciliation and her hopes for Canada in terms of reconciling the past to create a better future.

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First Nations and Big Retail Outlets - Signs of Respect

This presentation is called First Nations and Big Retail Outlets. I was inspired to do this while on a recent trip to Campbell River, BC when I noticed this Target Store logo with First Nations designs beside it. That’s when it dawned on me that the local First Nations were involved in a big way in the retail sector. Not only were they involved, but it was with an all star cast of some of the biggest names in retail like The Home Depot.

 

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